SOMETHING HUMAN

In the exhibition "Something Human" the Austrian photographer Timotheus Tomicek examines unspectacular everyday life. His images depict breaks in the expected and reveal some of the traces that are left behind when humans meet nature.
Udstillingsperiode:
28-05-2010 - 27-06-2010
Medie:
Photographpy
Titel:
SOMETHING HUMAN
Kunstner:
Timotheus Tomicek
When is ordinariness so ordinary that it awakens horror? Can the well-known routines of everyday life be depicted in a way that changes them completely? Through his lens the Austrian photographer Timotheus Tomicek catches typical situations and objects. His photographs examine unspectacular everyday life – straightforwardly, and with minute attention to detail. These studies of the trivial banality of life reveal some of the traces we leave behind – traces that testify to the often thoughtless behaviour that occurs when humans meet nature. Behind their apparently arbitrary motifs, the pictures are strictly composed, and are not without a subtle sense of humour. By focusing on the small displacements in normality and by catching strange details in the familiar, Tomicek teases our expectations that behind the visible something else may be revealed. His images depict breaks in the expected – breaks that force the viewer into wonderment. The photographs in SOMETHING HUMAN infuse normality with a fresh perceptiveness: the routines of everyday life get a touch of the unknown and the insecure.

Timotheus Tomicek was born in 1978 in Vienna, Austria, where he still lives. He studied photography, film and visual art in Vienna and has a Master's Degree from Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien. He has received several awards. Tomicek has participated in a number of festivals and group exhibitions in Berlin, London, Bratislava and New York among others. 

“SOMETHING HUMAN” at Galleri Image is his first exhibition in Denmark.

More info about the artist available here

Opening: Friday May 28, at 4 - 6 pm.

ARTIST TALK: 
Saturday May 29 at 2 pm

The exhibition is generously supported by Vilhelm Kiers Fond and the Ministry of Education, Art & Culture in Austria